HUNTERTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

 

THE GENESIS OF THE HUNTERTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH AND AREA HISTORY

 

            By Taft Heffelfinger............Edited by Mary Hatch  in 1979

Church history and records of Rev. Enoch A. Bunner

           

 

INTRODUCTION, CHAPTERS 2 and 3

RECORD OF PASTORS

CHAPTER 4

CHURCH MEMBERS and PROBATIONERS

BAPTISMS

WEDDINGS

FUNERALS

TREASURED MEMORIES

CHAPTER 5 and 6

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Just as an artist paints in the empty spaces of the outlines of his picture, so have I attempted to fill the outlines of the course of history as it took place in Perry Township in the County of Allen.   The first chapter you can liken to this outline on which with further evidence of facts I was able to fill the spaces between.    No history can be written about the church without including the history of the township, because these people are one and the same and to focus on only one part of it would not do justice to the background of those who have lent their lives in its making.

 

Living in this community for many years and having a life span of seventy of those one hundred and forty-five years that all this took place, with reference to land marks and the names of people, when placed together, becomes like the piecing of a huge jigsaw puzzle.   With little bits and pieces here and there it was easy to connect these and come up with this story. 

 

As you live and move about in the community, what you see is the end results of the lives and efforts of many people that lived, loved and died here.   It is an expression of their personalities as they built from the times of those early pioneers until today.   You may like what you see or you may not, but whichever the case may be, it is your heritage as they made it and handed it down to you. 

 

Did you ever wonder why Huntertown was located where it is instead of somewhere else?   Because everything has to have a beginning, Huntertown's beginning was set by a quirk of nature that took place a short time before the pioneers moved in.   This area was Indian territory with woods and trees where all the farms now stand.   On either side of the spot where Huntertown is now located there was a swamp land filled with muck and trees.   One very dry summer this swamp caught fire and burned and burned and burned until it consumed all of the trees including those on the high ground between them.   This left a clearing in the middle of a very big forest.   To open up the territory for settlement a road was cut through the woods from Fort Wayne to a town in what is now known as LaGrange County.   The name given this town was Lima, and thus the road was called the Fort Wayne and Lima Turnpike.   Lima later changed its name and is now called Howe, Indiana.

 

Settlers traveling on this road found that this clearing was a very convenient place to spend an evening on their journeys.   It was a spot that took less work to settle as it did not have to be cleared.   It was a convenient place to build log cabins.   As soon as people moved in and settled, this clearing became a spot where a store was needed so supplies could be purchased as they were needed.  

 

The Indians still roamed the woods;  but because General Wayne had subdued them, they were friendly.   Many stayed around for a long time, but as the land began to be cleared and opened up for farming, they finally disappeared.   This did not occur until some time later, and at times the settlers found them to be very aggressive.   They would come to the cabins of the people and demand fire water.   If you had some, well and good as they would take it and depart. 

 

You might say it was an Indian's way of playing trick or treat.   If you didn't have any then the safest thing that you could do was to invite him in to search the place.   This might leave them a little miffed because of your negligence, but most of the times they would leave and let you alone.   In this way fire water became one of the best stocks in trade that the settlers could have.   In modern terminology it was a form of protection and it was a good thing that prohibition wasn't in effect or the settlers would have had a much harder time establishing themselves. 

 

In the year of 1830 two men came into Perry Township as its very first settlers.   One was named CHARLES WEEKS and the other was named WILLIAM CASWELL.   Their tools for opening up the territory were the axe, a cross cut saw and the wedge.   If anyone has ever used these tools, it is soon evident that they had their work cut out for them.   If you look around in some of the older woods you will see a number of very large trees.   Wherever these men looked, there were just as many, no matter in which direction they looked.   Now a cross cut saw is not one of the easiest tools to use as you have to acquire some skill in the art.   First you pull it through the log, then you let your partner pull it back.   This seems simple enough but to a novice one of the first things that he does is press down on his end as it is pulled through.   This is not the proper way to do it as it does not help in the cutting and in the terminology of the day this is what was called "riding the saw".   Your partner would say, "I don't mind you pulling the saw but why do you have to ride it back?"   Anyone using an axe is soon aware that you can get a good sweat up in a hurry.  Likewise with the wedge and the sledge hammer..   A four foot tree and a stump to be grubbed out is a formidable undertaking, and you can see that to clear the land and put in crops was all hard labor.   The settlers were hardy men and hard-working men.   If they hadn't been, there wouldn't have been such a thing as a Huntertown United Methodist Church. 

 

Because of their efforts they made it all possible.   They brought their beliefs with them and just as today, they were not all of one mind, but came from different places and different backgrounds from the eastern part of the United States.

 

THOMAS and EPHRAIM H. DUNTEN and his son, HORACE F. came in 1833.   It was Horace that played a part in the establishment of religious services at a later date.   For all practical purposes this was the start of the Methodist Church, because from his efforts it has been a direct lineal descent.   For survival cash was not as much in demand in those days because they produced most of their food and garnered much from the forest, but there were things that they needed and these had to be purchased with money in Fort Wayne as they came in on the canal and were then trucked to the clearing.   To get cash the winter months were spent in trapping the furry animals of the woods and the furs sold in the spring.   To further this trade Ephraim built a log cabin for a store and hauled the supplies and furs to Fort Wayne and brought back the goods for exchange to the store in the clearing which was later to become Huntertown.   This was all done with a team of horses and a wagon.    This was an all day trip and depending on the weather, a pleasant one or an unpleasant one.   Because the woods kept the light from reaching the ground in the winter, the snows accumulated and lay amongst the trees most of the season.   During this period a bobsled was put into service, and watching the horses with their frosty noses and wrapped in blankets, the trip was made.   Most, if not all, things came down the canal from Toledo.

 

While these men were settling the clearing, the construction of the Lima Turnpike was begun.   With the primitive methods they had to use this took many hours, days and years.   The Lima Turnpike was the same road and street that goes through Huntertown in front of the church.   Most of its course is today known as State Road 3.   History was built around this road as it was the main thoroughfare for the opening of this part of the Northwest Territory.

 

No history of the Huntertown Church would be complete without having it included in its story, for without it, who knows where or when the church would be.   From this starting point the church gradually evolved into what it is today and that is the purpose of this story.....to tell how this all happened and what happened.   First the church is not the present building where we go every Sunday.   This is only the outward expression of it, for the church is that which a long line of members has contributed to it.   The true body of the church is the people and their expressions of piety.   Over many years there has been a constant process of change as new members have been added and old members have fallen by the wayside.   From 1834, when the first service was held, until today, is a period of 145 years in which these changes have taken place.   This is like a river from out of the past to the present.  

 

To put this in perspective, our country was established in 1776.   In 1834 the first services were held in the home of HORACE DUNTEN, the storekeeper.   This was a span of 56 years.   Huntertown was platted in 1870, which made another span of 35 years.    In 1900 the present church structure was built which made  another span of 30 years.   From then until today we have another span of 79 years.   What takes place from now on will be written in the years that are to follow. 

 

HORACE DUNTEN'S uncle, EPHRAIM, set up a tavern so the needs and wants of the settlers were taken care of.   Although alcohol was been one of the no no's of the Methodist Church, somehow it was employed by these settlers to take care of their aches and pains, as no doubt they had a great number, after working in the woods all day.   This same demon rum also was a protection from the Indians who still made their homes around the area.  

 

Oxen were used as beast of burden as well as horses.   One year the settlers had a near crop failure with the corn crop.   Somehow further north there was corn to be had, so they took an ox team and a wagon and went after it.  Today we can make the trip in an hour and a half;  but for them, however, it took seven days with camping at night on the way.   The road at this time was no more than a trail in the woods, and if we were to go over the same kind of road, our time would probably be extended too.   One thing that we might see in common though would be buffalo in the Kendallville area.

 

As the settlers came in they brought their values with them and one of these was that their children be educated.   To do this they had to erect a school house and one of the most convenient materials for this undertaking was the logs in the woods.   With these they constructed a little one-room schoolhouse in 1835 and the first teacher was a MR. AYRES.   As a hardy pioneer HORACE DUNTEN produced a large family consisting of ten children;  and of these, eight became teachers in their own right.   This was very good evidence of the intellectual qualities of these people.

 

It would press one to name all of the settlers, but I will list the names of some of the earliest.   To most who have lived here any length of time, the names will be familiar names as some of the roads are named after them.    If anyone looks at his abstract of title, he will see at least one name that is represented as those who worked so hard to make it all possible.   To buy this same land today it would cost a number of dollars, but in their time they purchased it with the sweat of their brow and a desire to promote a better way of life for themselves and their families. 

 

These first settlers' names loom large:   WOOD, HATCH, PARKER, RUNDLES, FITCH, SIMON and VANDOLAH.  Later settlers of just as much prominence are:   SURFACE, BOWSER, TUCKER, METCALF, SHRYOCK, GLOYD, THOMPSON, BENWARD, ANDREWS, HILLEGAS and MARTIN.   These people just as they do today, had their ailments, and just as today required the services of a doctor.   The first who served this purpose was DR. E. G. WHEELOCK.    From these people the church drew its membership as their spiritual needs had to be served as well as their physical needs.  

 

One who came at an early time was WILLIAM T. HUNTER in the year of 1837.   Because the town bears his name, it will be remembered for a long time.   He purchased land and built himself a house which still stands at the end of Washington Street on Hunter.   This is a large square type house that has an upper story and was large enough to serve the purpose that he gave it.   The first post office was in the house of CHARLES WEEKS and remained there from 1836 to 1840 when it was moved to the house of WILLIAM T. HUNTER.   Hunter then became the post master;  and as the post office had to have a name where people sent their mail, the post master gave it his name so that at this point it became Huntertown.   It was rather a misnomer to call it Huntertown at this point because it was not a town but just a small settlement in a clearing.   No doubt post masters in those days did not receive much remuneration for their work or rather there was a thirsty crowd around Huntertown whichever the matter might be.   Nevertheless Hunter deemed it necessary to put a tavern in his house at the same time.   This then became the focal point for all the settlers to congregate and to spend a day or an evening socializing.

 

Four years later in 1844 it was decided to remove the Miami Indians farther west to a reservation and because of this, most of the Indians moved out of this area.    Another historical event that took place about this time which had nothing to do with Huntertown, but did with the Methodist Church, was the establishment in Fort Wayne of a college called the Methodist College.   This was a co-educational school and by 1854 had an enrollment of 256 students.   Finally the burden of debt became too great for it and it disbanded.   The college was then taken over by the Lutheran Church and in its stead Concordia College was formed which had its presence there until a few years ago when it was turned over to the Indiana Institute of Technology.   After the Methodists left these buildings there was no school for a while.  In later times the college was reconstructed at Upland, Indiana, as Taylor University.   In the years before all this took place, in fact in 1840, Fort Wayne was incorporated making Huntertown a satellite to the seat of Allen County.  

 

The next event to take place that placed Huntertown on the map was the planking of the Lima Road.  This was started in 1849.   Up until this time the road was dusty in summer, rutty in the spring, and generally rough in the winter when it was frozen hard.   Without pneumatic tires on the wheels of their wagons and carts, this made for rough riding in the winter, almost impassable in the spring when it thawed out, and very dusty in the summer.   To correct this situation it was decided to lay wood plank on the road as this had proven successful on a road from Ohio to Fort Wayne.   One of the most plentiful materials at the time was lumber which could be had in large quantities from the surrounding woods.   All it took was man power to convert this so it could be usable on the road to hard surface it.   To this and a contract,  or should I say, several contracts were let to carry out this enterprise.   To put it in perspective better than I can do in a few words, I am here placing one of the flyers that was placed at strategic locations to attract bids for construction by worthy contractors.   If there is anyone in the need of a job it would be well to transport themselves back in time and apply, because evidently such man power was needed.   

 

                        ______________________________________________________

 

                                                PLANK ROAD LETTING   

 

The undersigned will receive sealed proposals at the house of J. B. Hanna, in Huntertown, until the 29th of March next.

 

     FOR THE GRADING OF 26 MILES OF THE FORT WAYNE AND LIMA TURNPIKE ROAD

 

Persons bidding for the above work will state the price per rod for grading, including the grubbing, bridging, drainage, and laying of plant, except the large hills, which will be bid for, by the yard:  and delivery of the plank by the thousand feet, board measure.   Jobs will be let in sections of five miles, to commence at the saw mills.   Any information in regard to the above can be had at the undersigned, or at the office of S. Hanna, in Fort Wayne.

 

            EMPLOYMENT CAN BE GIVEN TO ANY NUMBER OF HANDS.

 

                                                Wm. MITCHEL

                                                Superintendant

                                                F. W. & L. T. Co.

                                                February 26, 1849

                        ________________________________________________________

 

With the letting of these contracts the plank road made it much easier to travel and was a great asset to the further opening of the territory for settlement and the progress of the area.   Huntertown then became a layover station on the way farther north, and also those coming from the north could rest their weary bones for the night.   After the road was planked it made it possible for a stage coach line to be placed in operation and thus furthered the convenience of the traveler.   Anyone having seen a western picture can visualize  one of these clattering stage coaches on the plank as they headed for their destination.   With this dissertation of the times, I am not so much as giving the history of the church, as I am describing the conditions of the times.

 

In 1856 it was further deemed by the settlers that higher education was necessary for the improvement of the intellect and the advancement toward a better society.   To further this, three men, NATHANIEL FITCH, JACOB KELL, and GEORGE B. GLOYD, established at the corner of the Gump Road and 327 a building known as the Perry Seminary.   The seminary thrived and had begun to have some influence when the Civil War between the States was declared.   With this declaration all of the students enlisted in the Union Army and left the classroom bare.   This terminated  the usefulness of the school and it was never used again for this purpose, but was later removed to the Kell farm on Shoaff Road where it served as a barn for many years before being torn down, sometime after 1970.   DR. WHEELOCK was a pupil in this school, as were many other well known people of Perry Township.  

 

The most valued possession that a person could have during this period of history was a horse.   It not only helped on the farm as a beast of burden but it also was used with a buggy for the transportation of the family to church.   The loss of one of these was truly a great loss because, unlike a modern tractor, it took much longer to make one and you had to have the right propagation machinery to do so.    Many times a farmer would lose one through sickness and this was just like losing one of the family and often could not be helped.   If it were stolen, this was a different matter and a horse thief was considered one of the lowest of vermin.    There was a notorious gang of desperadoes, led by a man by the name of Gregory McDougal in northeastern Indiana.   These men did not draw the line on how they carried out their unlawful acts, which sometimes included murder.   Horse thievery was the most prevalent  that the committed.   To combat this, citizens organized a group called the regulators and many from Perry Township belonged.    In 1857 the regulators caught Mr. McDougal and stretched his neck at Diamond Lake in Noble County.    After this, peace reigned for a while and a horse was safe again in his own pasture. 

 

Just as the coming of the railroads made the canal obsolete in so short a number of years in operation, so did the railroads make the stage coach later on become obsolete.   Between the time that the Lima Road was planked, twenty years had elapsed and to further the progress of the community the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad was built from Fort Wayne to Grand Rapids, Michigan, in the year of 1869.   Up until this time, Huntertown had been a stop over for the stagecoach for travelers and a trading place for the pioneers.   With the coming of the trains, Hunter decided to plat that which he could of the town and he had several others conspired in this undertaking.   He owned land north of what is now called Hunter Street and seeing the winds of change coming, he bought land south of the street from SOLOMON P. HASWEL, and his wife, Payrinthia in 1866.   Others who owned land tyhat was platted at the same time which lay west of the Lima Road were JAMES O. BEARDSLEY, M. P. RICKET, and JAMES BALLOU.   This land was divided into two plats.   One was bounded by Hunter Street, Lima Plank Road, Main Street and Railroad Street and two rows of lots south of Main Street.   The other addition was bounded by Hunter Street, Lima Plank Road, Edgerton, and a series of lots north of Edgerton and the G.R. & I. Railroad.   The surveying was done in 1869 and entered in the books at the County Court House on January 12, 1870.   At this point, Huntertown became officially a town.   The Beardsley addition was also platted on the east side of the Lima Plank Road at the same time.    With the coming of the railroad a grain terminal was built at the end of Main Street and this further enhanced the area for the farmer as this was a more complete and better outlet for the sale of the fruits of their labors in the production of grain.   This was such a forward step in the development of the community that in the first year that the town was platted, 41 lots were sold.   Several times the grain elevators were burned to the ground and each time it was rebuilt.   In 1910 this was one of those times and when it was rebuilt the sale of lumber and other hardware items were added to the merchandise to be sold.  DANIEL STEINER took over its management and the business prospered making it the only one in town that required the hiring of employees.   For many years this was the central business that kept the town a thriving place in the township.  

 

The town never was a very large town as attested by a notation that I found which stated that in the year of 1917 the population was only 250.   From this point it slowly grew until the town was incorporated in 1966, when it had a resident population of 770.  

 

To further the advance of transportation, the Fort Wayne and Northwestern Traction Company was formed.   The first run was made between Fort Wayne and Huntington with a steam engine carrying passengers.   The purpose though was to do this by the use of electricity so trolley lines were constructed to carry this out.   A branch was built to run from Fort Wayne to Garrett which came through the center of Huntertown down the Lima Road and just north of town headed almost directly east.   When it reached the east edge of Fisher West's farm, it turned north to Garrett.   The interurban gave Huntertown a little more stature because this gave the community more and better means for travel for the period of those times.    This made it easier for the minister who at the time was preaching both at Wallen and at Cedar Chapel in DeKalb County, to make the circuit by faster and more commodious accommodations.     This branch was started and completed in the years of 1906 and 1907, but was abandoned later on in the middle thirties.   

 

As the automobile came on the scene and developed from the clunker to the more streamlined variety, it was soon evident that it would be necessary to have a hard surface road to make them more pleasant to drive on.   For this purpose the State Highway Commission found it prudent to pave the Lima Road with concrete from Fort Wayne to Kendallville.   During the year of 1924, they carried this out from Fort Wayne to Huntertown, then the following year from Huntertown to Kendallville.

 

In 1915 land was purchased by the County on the Lima Road where a structure for the housing of the aged and the indigent was built.   Just north of it was built a hospital called the Irene Byron, named after a World War I nurse, and used to treat those who had fallen victim of the dreaded disease of tuberculosis.    This was the year of 1916 when it was completed.

 

The town of Huntertown was incorporated August 10, 1966.   This brings most of the background history of the area up-to-date.

 

CHAPTER 2

 

I will now take up the history of the church as a body and the physical structure of the buildings that served the purpose of carrying out the worship of God as the membership saw it.    Just how best to approach this subject to make it come alive and mean something  besides a recitation of dates and facts?   If I remember right, history has been one of the dullest subjects to a great many people as they studied it in school.   Somehow because of the necessity of condensing it and shrinking it so it can be included in a reasonably small space, it takes the feelings and the dreams and hopes out of it so it is as they say DULL.    With the material I have I am going to have to reconstruct it to make it interesting to you and also give you the feel of the times.   You have already read the background which I have written to prepare you for this.

 

On some pages up ahead I have included a list of the ministers that have served from the time that the church was started until the present date with their years of service and the changes that took place just as I received them in verbatim.    This is interesting but it is also the dull part that so many find unworthy of their time.   But like a cross word puzzle, it is possible to fit these together and weave a story that I hope can be of interest to you.   

 

Now you will note from this fact sheet that there have been many people who have at one time or another served their allegiance to the church body.   Not all of these were of one hundred percent attendance, but seemed to drift in and out as their conscience dictated to them.   It seemed to be a struggle between their taste for the secular and the spiritual.   Today the secular seems to have a stronger pull than ever, but instead of decrying this fact we have to take it in stride and see that though it is a struggle for men's souls, it is one that apparently must be lived with.   Also in the hundred and forty-five years in which the church has existed, all of those who played a part in its early history and many who came in later have passed on to their reward and are now only a cipher mark in the records of the church.   As we have no way of communicating with these people this cipher mark makes them for us a non person, but history shows that they were living warm-blooded loving human beings and for many of us if it had not been for their existence we would not be here.   History is important to us as it connects us to the past and to these people who, if we were able to know them personally, would be the best of friends.

 

Now it is evident that the early settlers felt the need of religious services.   This was brought about in 1834 by the meeting of HORACE DUNTEN and a MR. NICKERSON, a methodist exhorter.   No doubt they casually brought up the subject and as they warmed to the discussion it was agreed that they should hold a service in Horace's home.   You will notice by the date that Horace was just a young man and probably had acquired a new bride and a new cabin not too long ago.   As for those attending this meeting there could not have been many because the settlement was new, and what was to come after was just getting started.   The number of meetings that were held between 1834 and 1836 was not determined, but in 1836 Reverend STEVEN R. BALL of Fort Wayne came to the settlement and helped to start a class in the house of JAMES THOMPSON.   These were not large meetings as there were only six in attendance, and no doubt, were two men and their wives and one bachelor and a minister.   Without the aid of electric lights, and kerosene lamps not being in vogue as yet, it was no doubt necessary to hold these meetings by the help of candlelight.    As a home, cabins were small and the quarters were cramped, so as the membership grew, it was decided tyhat the best place to hold meetings was in the Caswell School, which by this time had been built. 

 

Those meetings were conducted by a circuit riding minister, and when JOHN ASHELEY moved from Catskill, New York, to a place in Wallen they started having meetings there also.   In this manner, Wallen came into the circuit.   Wallen continued to be in the circuit until 1923, then again for a short time in the middle thirties.   The name of the Wallen church was Bethel.    To complete the class organization, three families by the names of GEORGE ASHLEY, JAMES W. FLEMMING and U. J. COOK took place in 1840.    To house this newly organized body a log church was built and given the name of Bethel.   This took place in the year of 1843 and was used until the village of Wallen was platted and a new church was built in the year of 1871.

 

In 1846 Huntertown worked themselves out of the schoolhouse and into a new frame church which sat on the land  which is now occupied by Glenn Shank's home and was almost across from  the present church.    The dimensions of this church was 30' by 40' and in the light of the price that is  proposed for the present addition that is being placed on the present structure, the cost was ridiculously low.   For the grand sum of $1500.00 they got a well constructed wood frame church that stood up well into the twentieth century.   With a little bit of upkeep it no doubt would still be there, but without any help it declined and gave up the ghost in its old age.   You can just hear some wise acre say, "Well, they just don't make them anymore like they used too!"   And no doubt he is right because the proposed structure is much larger to accommodate a larger church membership and is to be made of much better materials.   

 

There seems no way of verifying this, except that the evidence is still present on the ground.   However, this is what I found in the records and I will present it as written.

 

A Universalist Church at Huntertown was organized at the house of Dr. D. VANDERHAYDEN in 1850, with seventeen members.  WILLIAM CHAPLIN of Kosciusko Co., IN, was the officiating pastor on the occasion and visited the congregation at irregular intervals for meetings suceeding that date.   

 

In 1851 they erected a house of worship on a knoll just north of the Methodist Church.   This also cost them $1500.00 which must have been the going price for churches at the time.   With its construction, Mr. Chaplin became the pastor.   The membership grew for several years and reached 63;  then in 1863, they organized a Sunday School class with a hundred pupils.    As the pioneers came into the community of Huntertown they were not all of like mind and coming from different parts of the country their church affiliations were of different denominations.   However, these seemed to homogenize in the two existing churches, and if there was any rivalry it is not indicated in the records.   Because of this homogenization at the Universalist Church, there was finally drawn a conclusion that two churches were not needed and the membership dwindled until it was no more.   Because the church was of sturdy construction, it stood for a long time and at one time was used as the hall for the Gleaners which was a mutual insurance organization that existed for many years.   In the early forties it was purchased by FRANCIS BROWN and turned into an apartment for which it is being utilized today.   

 

In 1849 the Allen Circuit was organized.   Some of the churches that were included in this circuit were Huntertown, Bethel, Wesley, Barnes etc.    How it came about I do not know, but at one time during the turn of the century Huntertown was the center of the circuit that consisted of Bethel at Wallen, Cedar Chapel in DeKalb County and Swan in Noble County.   When Wallen was platted the residence of the pastor of the circuit was located in Huntertown.

 

This must have been a rented house because there was no permanent residence until one was purchased at the corner of Hunter and Webster Street in 1888.     This served well until a new one was built north of the present church in 1904.   As for the main part of the structure of the present Huntertown Methodist Church, this was built in the year of 1900 or should I say a little before because this was the year that it was dedicated.   An addition was added in the year 1955, and at present another addition is being planned.   

 

CHAPTER 3

 

Going over the names of those who served the church as ministers, I noticed the shortness of tenancy.   Up until a few years ago, if a minister served the same church for more than two years he was a phenomenon.    He was not only a circuit rider but he very seldom dwelled in one place for any length of time.   Transient was the word that came to mind, but talking to the chaplain at Parkview, he suggested that the name itinerate was the word most used.    This may well describe the situation and I found also that it was a policy of the church to keep them on the move.   Whatever the purpose was, it held very well into the twentieth century, but in later years has been less observed than before.   

 

You will also note that a great many men have been chosen to serve their fellow men in this calling and it has always been held as a great honor and mark of distinction that they do so.    There are two professions that have always commanded the greatest respect from their fellow men, and that is the profession of medicine and the ministry.   Many mothers have dreamed that their sons would grow to become one of these.    For many of them, and the list that is compiled here, you can see that their wish has been granted because from the year of 1834 until this year that I write of in 1979, there have been a great many.    Just as a beautiful piece of music uses many notes in its composition, so does the church require many people to keep it vibrant and continuous.   You might say the minister, in baseball parlance, is the pitcher on the mound, the one around which all activity occurs, yet once he delivers his message the rest of the team has to carry the ball.

 

You will also notice that besides the name of such a minister, the events that took place on the date has been added.   I have tried to weave these into their chronological happenings in the story that has gone before.   You cn go over these again as you read the sheet with all the dates and times as they were taken directly from the records.   I know you will be interested in them as I was and hope you get as much enjoyment from them.    By doing this you can draw your own conclusions as to what took place and with a little imagination weave your own interpretations as to what happened.   So here is the list for you to peruse at your own pleasure: 

 

CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF PASTORS AND INTERESTING EVENTS,  HUNTERTOWN, WALLEN PARISH

 

As the record before 1849 is somewhat indefinite, both Fort Wayne and north Allen County appointments are given.   After then, the years of death and deceased and addresses of living former pastors are given where known.   There may be errors.   Dr. W. W. Sweet's "History of the North Indiana Conference" was used as a guide.

 

1834

Early settlers in Washington Twp.  Meetings first held at Huntertown in the house of HORACE F. DUNTEN, by MR. NICKERSON, Methodist Exhorter

1836-1837

STEVEN R. BALL (Ft. Wayne) organized Huntertown class at the home of JAMES THOMPSON in 1836.    Meeting later held at Caswell School.   Bethel class organized about this time under guidance of GEORGE JOHN ASHLEY.    Bethel Church built in 1836 or (1840)

1838

JAMES T. ROBE  (Fort Wayne)

1839

JACOB COLCLASER (Fort Wayne)

1839

SAMUEL REED  (Little St. Joseph Mission)

1840

WALTER L. HUFFMAN  (Iroquois Mission)

1840   1841

FRANCIS A. CROMWELL  (Fort Wayne)   Some say Bethel class organized about this time composed of GEORGE ASHLEY, JAMES W. FLEMMING, U.J. COOK and families

1841

SAMUEL SMITH   (Eel River Mission)

1842

CHARLES W. MILLER  (Eel River Mission)

1842

GEORGE M. BOYD   (Fort Wayne)

1843

HAWLEY M. BEERS    (Fort Wayne) (Bethel Church land deeded trustees.)

1843

J. C. MEDSKER  (Little St. Joseph Mission)

1844

BENJAMIN WINANS   (St. Joseph Mission)

1844  1845

J. S. BAYLESS   (Fort Wayne)

1845

W. J. FORBES   (Little St. Joseph Mission)

1846

SAMUEL BRENTON  (Fort Wayne)   (Frame church built at Huntertown)

1846

EVENTOUS DOUD   (Little St. Joseph Mission)

1847

AMASA JOHNSON   (Fort Wayne)

1848

WILLIAM WILLSON   (Fort Wayne)

1848

T. F. PALMER(St. Mary's Mission)

1849

T. F. PALMER   (Allen circuit organized)

1850

JESSE3 SPARKS,  A. GREENMAN  (D. 1914)

1851

J. J. COOPER   (D. 1888)   Allen County, consisted of all preaching places in North West Allen :  Huntertown, Bethel, Wesley Chapel, Barnes, Swan, Cedar Chapel, etc.

1852

J. H. PAYTON    (D. 1883)

1853

J. W. WELCH     (D. 1917)

1854

D. B. CLARY

1855

M. M. HAUN

1856   1857

JAMES JOHNSON    (D. 1897)

1858   1859

R. A. NEWTON    (D. 1890)

1860   1861

C. W. LYNCH    (D. 1908)

1862

J. M. MANN    (D. 1881)

1863   1864

J. H. SLADE

1865

E. E. PEARMAN

1866   1867

JAMES GREER    (D. 1888)

1868   1869

N. T. TEDDYCORD    (D. 1911)

1870

ISAAC COOPER    (D. 1916)

1871   1872

W. H. EDWARDS   (Wallen Village platted and Wallen frame church built)

1873

WILLIAM LASH  (D. 1916)

1874   1875

J. P. NASH    (D. 1903)   (Huntertown replaces Wesley as head of circuit, February 27, 1975)

1876

LEWIS ROBERTS    (D. 1898)

1877

J. W. LOWERY    (Pastors residence established at Huntertown)

1878

NEWTON BURWELL

1879   1880

________________ completed 7 months of this term

1881

J. N. McMAHON    (D. 1907)

1882

T. S. COOK    (D. 1910)

1883   1884

I. J. BICKNELL

 

1885

W. E. McCARTY   (D. 1920)

1886

J. H. SLACK    (D. 1909)

1887   1888

NOSEA WOOLPERT    (D. 1907)  (1st parsonage bought about 1888.   Corner of Webster and Hunter Street)

1889

A. L. FERKNER    (D. 1911)

1890   1891

T. F. FRECH    (D. 1924)

1892   1893

M. M. SMITH    (D. 1913)

 

1894   1896

S. J. MELLENGER    (D. 1814)

1897  1900

W. E. MURRAY  (D. 1927)  (Present Huntertown church built & dedicated, June 24, 1900)

1901   1902

RALPH C. JONES

1903   1905

N. P. BARTON     (Parsonage built in 1904)

1906   1907

G. H. BRIGHT

1908   1912

E. A. BUNNER   (Upland, Indiana)

1913

HENRY LACY    (D. 1927)

1914

E. C. LINDSAY 6 mos,  J. W. GRUBER  6 mos

1915

J. W. GRUBER    (Lansboro, Iowa)

1916   1919

J. R. STELL    (622 Central Ave., Anderson, Ind.)

1920   1922

EDWIN DICKSON     (Wallen Church built 1919)

1923   1924

J. M. STEWART   (Up until 1923 Wallen and Huntertown used the same pastor.   This was discontinued until 1935 when again they were together for a short time.)

1925

R. OMEROD  (3 mo.)  O. J. BRIGGS  (4 mo.)   G. F. CROWE   (5 mo.)

1926   1927

G. F. CROWE    (Ct. Wallen & Cedar Chapel & Huntertown)

1925   1928

N. E. SMITH  (Huntertown and Cedar Chapel)

1929   1931

R. A. FENSTEMACHER

1928  1930

M. T. SHADY  (Wallen)

1931   1932

J. C. BEAN  (Wallen)

1933   1934

WAYNE PAULAN  (Wallen)

1932   1934

W. E. LOVELESS  (Huntertown and Wallen)

1935

W. E. LOVELESS  (Huntertown and Wallen)

1937   1943

HAROLD E. THRASHER  (Huntertown and Wallen)

1944   to ?

W. R. SCHMELTZER

?  to     1951

J. F. STEPHANSON

1952   1956

HOWARD WESTERN

1957  1959

CHUCK RHODES

1960  1963

BOB JACKSON

1964   1970

HERSCHEL McCORD

1970  1977

JIM DICKEY

1977

CECIL HENDRIX

 

CHAPTER 4

 

Those who make history can themselves best give an account of it and the part that they played in it.   Because of this I am inserting the records that the Reverend Bunner gave of his years of service to the circuit of Wallen, Huntertown, Cedar Chapel and Swan.   His is a superb story of the period between 1908 and 1913.   It reveals far more than can be had by reading the other records of the times because it is a point by point account of the people involved.   The Reverend Enoch A. Bunner through his power of recall has put together a story that tells much about this period in which he played so great a part.   You will note after reading the number of pastors that have served the church in its previous history that his time of service was longer than most.   Somehow when you read it, the personality  of the man comes through, and you will also note that his must have been very engaging.    I was born in the year of 1908 and I remember some of the things about him because we lived by the Cedar Chapel Church and my parents often invited him for dinner.   Mother somehow knew how to opick the best rooster out of the flock, and for these times a chicken dinner was just about one of the best things that you could have for a visit by a minister.   The visits I remember were when I was about four years old.  

 

This account made me feel so much at home when I read it.   Almost all of the people in it I knew their names as though they were as familiar as my own.   Also many of my own family were represented;  such as, my grandfather, uncles and aunts and my older sisters.   If one wants a recap of his life, when early memories just start, things like this can set off a chain reaction that makes one feel that he is reliving it all over again.   While reading it I had this feeling.  

 

One of the first things that you will notice is that this was the horse and buggy days.   Automobiles were just entering the market and they were primitive for the period.   Most observations of the wise acres of the day were that they would not last.    Somehow to most the horse was still the most reliable means of transportation.   If one ever owned a horse it would soon become evident that a horse was just about one of the best friends that man ever had.   Of course it required a lot of attention when it came to feeding, getting rid of the waste and combing the burrs and the sweat from their hide.   The good Reverend must not have had this problem with his good horse that he so affectionately called John, or if he did he was not going to tell anybody about it for fear that he might hear him and leave him down when he needed him most.   Knowing the distance that good John had to travel, he sounds like he must have been one of the better ones of his species.

 

In his account he mentions the speed of the auto and how his good friend Brother ANDREW SURFUS helped him in his round of duties when he needed him most.    I am sure that one of our modern teenagers would have had him there much sooner even though it might have not been all in one piece.   However, one of these teenagers would not have been so happy driving Andrew's car, especially if he had a flat tire in transit.   When they said clincher tires in those days they meant it.   I can remember the 1913 Model T Ford that BERT PARKER had with all the shiny brass adorning its radiator.   I do not know what brother Andrew drove, but you can bet, it must have been one of its cousins. 

 

There are a great many names on the records that he has compiled, and because of the nature of the times these people were more familiar and closer in friendship.   How better could you place on paper the full range of human emotions than the ones he covered?   People were born and baptized and brought into the church, and for many the birth of a child is a very happy event as we attest to this by often celebrating their birthdays.   It also establishes that period of time that one's life is spent on this earth, and the age of a person places them in proper relations to events as they occur.  

 

Marriage too is a happy time in most lives and the list given here shows that, regardless of the year, they all have something in common.    The love between two adults of the opposite sex and the promise it holds for the future of the race is one that thrills us all.   You may recognize some one of your relatives in this past generation going through the same feelings and excitement that you, who have done the same, have felt.

 

However there is tragedy in peoples' lives and these are the times, when we lost loved ones.  If one has lived a long span it is the graceful ending for that one, but even when this occurs there are often children and grandchildren that feel the painfulness of loss.    If one's life is cut short at an early age, leaving a family of young ones, it is doubly tragic.   Reading over the records you will often see that this happened many times because medicine had not yet conquered the infectious diseases.    One that stands out on May 11, 1911 of OTTO and DWIGHT KLEMM of Swan, Indiana, who perished both at the same time in a fire.    To lose a father and a son in this way could be nothing but terrifying.   Of these kinds of happenings human life is built, and if one broadens his own mind and feelings for such things, it is easy to see how God can love us so much because we are all his children facing a world that is sometimes too large for us.

 

I will end my discourse on this part of the records so you  can go over them yourself in the following pages.   

 

                        ____________________________________________________________

 

                        HUNTERTOWN CHURCH RECORD  

 

            Members from 1904 till April 1913.   Probationers from all the work, also

            Baptisms, Weddings, and funerals

 

                        By ENOCH A. BUNNER, Pastor.

                                    These were the horse and buggy days, with faithful horse, John.

 

HUNTERTOWN CLASS,  Members and Probationers

 

The ones that were there 1908, then ones added and those who died and moved away by transfer and otherwise marked off.    ENOCH A. BUNNER, Pastor for five years, sent from following conferences, giving place date and Bishop.

 

Conference

 

Anderson, Indiana, sent April 1908 by Bishop Berry

Greenfield, Indiana, April 5, 1909 by Bishop Anderson

Bluffton, Indiana, April 11, 1910 by Bishop Cranston

Kokomo, Indiana, April 11, 1911 by Bishop Hughes       

Wabash, Indiana, April 1, 1912 by Bishop Moore

 

Moved, letter, death or otherwise, by E. A. Bunner, or rec. by E. A. Bunner

 

Members

Andrews, Lella

 

 

Andrews, Edna

Married Shuster, moved

April 18, 1910

Andrews, Alma

 

 

Andrews, Mabel L.

 

 

Bunner, Bertha A.

Letter Presby. Transfer, Pastor's wife, moved

Ohio, December 29, 1912    Spiceland, Ind.,  April 1912

Burrell, William

 

 

Burrell Theron

 

 

Brown, Samuel A.

Letter Sedro Wolley, moved

January 15, 1909

Brown, Clara

(was Nelson)  Letter Sedro Wolley, moved

January 15, 1910

Bunting, Nettie

Moved or something

1910

Bracht, Caroline A.

Received

May 14, 1909

Bracht, William

Received

September 8, 1912

Bracht, Custon O.

Received pro.

March 14, 1909

Ballou, Mary

Received

June 1, 1911

Busze, Stella

 

 

Baker, A. J.

Received letter

April 2, 1911

Baker, Jennie

Received letter

April 2, 1911

Baker, Myrtle

Received letter

April 2, 1911

Boren, Lillian

Rceived, Probationer

May 30, 1912

Carey, Rev. Epherian

Received

1912

A. T. Corbin

Letter

May 23, 1911

Corbin Ocie Hall

Letter

May 23, 1911

Collins, Minnie

Letter, Probationer

May 23, 1909

Dunten, Jennie

 

 

Dunten, Washington

 

 

Dunten, Sidney M.

 

 

Dunten,  Allie

 

 

Dunten, Rhena

From Pro.

February 26, 1910

DeBolt, Loyd

From Pro.

September 8, 1912

Emerick, May

 

 

Eby, Lyda

 

 

Entler, Albert

Letter, Illinois

April 12, 1911

Entler, Ethel

Letter, Illinois

April 12, 1911

Gaff, Mary

Probationer

May 24, 1912

Greenfield, Zella

Without letter, moved 

 

Gallaway, Hannah

Letter, Churubusco, moved

May 7, 1910

Garman, Martha

 

 

Geller, Ida

Joined English Lutheran, moved

June 14, 1908

Glazier, Sarah

Rec.

1912

Garman, Benjaman F.

Rec.

December 29, 1912

Hall, Frank

Letter

May 23, 1911

Hatch, Flora

Letter to Ft. Wayne, IN, moved

May 29, 1910

Hatch, Theron V.

 

 

Hatch, Ella

 

 

Hatch, S. Brenton

 

 

Hatch, Althea

 

 

Hatch, Mable

 

 

Hatch, Alice

Moved, married Sloffer

 

Hatch, Herman

 

 

Houghton, Dr. L.

 

 

Houghton, Romania

 

 

Hall, Jessie

 

 

Hall, Earnest

Rec., died January 2, 1912

May 23, 1909

Hall, Loren

Pro.

May 21, 1909

Hippenhammer, Isaac

 

 

Hippenhammer, Jennie

 

 

Miss Ersil C. Kyler

Pro., Mrs. Howard Dancer

May 24, 1912

Hillegas, Ella

 

 

Harding, Erma

 

 

Hollopeter, Israel

Letter, moved 

July 26, 1908

Hollopeter, Jemima

Letter, moved

July 26, 1908

Hollopeter, Herschel

Letter, moved

April 23, 1911

Hollopeter, Ema

Moved, Was Tilden

 

Hursh, Don

Pro.

July 31, 1910

Hursh, Myrlie B.

Pro.

July 31, 1910

Harding, Maggie

Was Kell

 

Kell, George V.

 

 

Kell, Jessie

 

 

Kell, Gertrude

 

 

Kell, Louise

 

 

Kell, Beatrice

 

 

Kell, Robert

Letter, Tuna, Texas

September 12, 1912

Kell, Walter

 

 

Kell, Dolly

Married Rundles

 

Kell, Frank

 

 

Kell, Ollie

 

 

Kell, Catherine

Died

May 5, 1911

Kell, Maggie

Married Harding

December 21, 1911

Knop, Manford

Letter U. B.

December 18, 1910

Knop, Amanda

Letter U. B.

December 18, 1910

Knop, Carrie

Pro.

February 26, 1911

Knop, Florence

Pro.

January 25, 1912

Ketchum, Sarah

 

 

Kruse, John

Pro.

September 8, 1912

Klinger, Lottie

Pro.

January 19, 1912

Lathem, Mary

Deceased

 

Meyers, Cora

 

 

McComb, Rosella

Pro.

November 20, 1910

Nelson, Stella Busze

 

 

Nelson, Clara

Married Brown, moved

 

Nelson, Manilla May

Pro.

July 19, 1908

Porter, Margaret

 

 

Porter, George

Moved, without letter

 

Pulver, Mary

 

 

Rundles, Dolly Kell

Letter to Urbana, Ill., moved 

January 6, 1910

Rundles, John Clinton

Letter, moved

April 19, 1908

Rundles, Mrs. Mary

Letter from U. B.

November 20, 1910

Runyon, Gladys

 

March 19, 1913

Surfus, Andrew

 

 

Surfus, Mary E.

 

 

Surfus, Jerry

Letter, Auburn M. E., moved

January 25, 1913

Surfus, Lydia

Letter, Auburn M. E., moved

January 25, 1913

Surfus, L. May

Pro. moved

May 24, 1912

Surfus, Orville

 

 

Surfus, Mary Burrell

 

 

Schuster, Edna

(was Andrews)  Letter to Garrett M. E. , moved

August 22, 1910

Sloffer, Alice

(see Hatch)

 

Sible, Lena West

Moved

Died May 18, 1909

Smith, Rebecca

Rec.

July 16, 1910

Smith, Rebecca (same)

Moved, Letter to Trinity, Fort Wayne

October 9. 1910

Snyder, Myrtle M. 

Pro.

December 23, 1911

Smith, Susan

 

 

Smith, Ella

 

 

Smith, Eva

 

 

Simons, Addie

 

 

Sovine, Nellie

Pro.

May 30, 1913

Thompson, Laurie

Pro.

February 26, 1913

Wagoner, Sarah

 

 

West, Fisher C.

 

 

West, Ellen

 

 

Wyatt, Elizabeth

 

 

Wyatt, Verne

 

 

Wyatt, Malissa

Pro.

May 23, 1909

Whetziel, Galena

Letter Kalamazoo, Mich., moved

January 30, 1911

Witt, Albert

Moved

 

Witt, Sarah

Moved, don't know how

 

 

 I hope no names have been missed;  have tried hard to get all.

 

PROBATIONERS - HUNTERTOWN WORK

            April 1908 to April 1913

 

 

Date

Name

Church

August 18, 1895

Jennie Hatch

Huntertown

August 18, 1895

Mary Preston

Huntertown

May 12, 1905

Edna Pulver Malcolm

Huntertown

May 12, 1905

Earl M. Wyatt

Huntertown

January 4, 1906

Olie Shriver

Huntertown

May 10, 1907

Herbert A. Greenfield

Huntertown

July 18, 1907

Manilla May Nelson Bond   Rec. July 19, 1908

Huntertown

May 17, 1907

Mrs. Harvey Preston, rec.    May 16, 1909

Swan

May 24, 1907

Ralph Preston, rec. May 16, 1909

Swan

February 4, 1908

Grace Golden, rec. Jan. 9, 1909

Wallen

February 5, 1908

Elsie Opliger, rec. Jan. 31, 1909

Wallen

February 5, 1908

Rennecker, Rec. Jan. 31, 1909

Wallen

February 5, 1908

Bessie Opliger, Rec. January 17, 1909

Wallen

December 1907

Cynthia Thompson,  Rec. August 22, 1909

Cedar Chapel

December 1907

Marie Heffelfinger (Walters) Rec. August 22, 1909

Cedar Chapel

May 24, 1904

Marie Thrush

Cedar Chapel

July 19, 1908

Arie Gaff,   Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

May 22, 1908

Marion Thrush,  Rec.  August 22, 1909

Cedar Chapel

July 26, 1908

Earnest Hall,   Rec. May 23, 1909

Huntertown

July 26, 1908

Charles Rundles,  Sent to Urbana, Ill.

Huntertown

January 15, 1909

Ira Grogg,   Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

January 15, 1909

Bertha Grogg,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

January 31, 1909

Sarah Rennecker,  Rec. July 3, 1910

Swan

February 28, 1909

Nettie Bricker,  rec. May 16, 1909

Swan

May 5, 1909

Jessie Warner, Rec.  June 13, 1909

Swan

May 5, 1909

Fern Warner,  Rec. June 13, 1909

Swan

May 5, 1909

Lincoln Bricker,  Rec. May 16, 1909

Swan

May 27, 1909

George Shriver

Huntertown

May 27, 1909

Mrs. George Shriver

Huntertown

May 27, 1909

Mallisa Wyatt,  Rec. May 27, 1909

Huntertown

May 27, 1909

Minnie Collins,  Rec. May 27, 1909

Huntertown

May 27, 1909

Lillie Wyatt

Huntertown

May 23, 1909

Loren Hall,  Rec. May 23, 1909

Huntertown

August 14, 1909

Wilbur Dunten, passed away

Huntertown

August 12, 1909

Garnet Pence, passed away

Cedar Chapel

August 12, 1909

Iva Heffelfinger,   Rec. August 22, 1910

Cedar Chapel

August 28, 1909

Silas Wyatt, passed away

Huntertown

July 1909

Alice Dunten

Huntertown

February 10, 1910

Stella Clark,   Rec.  August 22, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Mary Williams,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Edith arner,   Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Grace Balliet,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Anna Rickey,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Elsie Haynes,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

May Feagler

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Mina Fair,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

John Wappes,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

Alice A. Wappes,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 10, 1910

May Murrey,  Rec. July 24, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 12, 1910

Charles Heffelfinger,  Rec. July 7, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 12, 1910

Amanda Heffelfinger,  Rec. July 7, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 12, 1910

Thelma Hawver

Cedar Chapel

February 13, 1910

Frank Manges

Cedar Chapel

February 13, 1910

Irene Manges

Cedar Chapel

February 13, 1910

Sarah Tompkins, Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

February 20, 1910

Archie Lung,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

April 31, 1910

Roscoe Lung,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

April 31, 1910

Loyal Grogg, Rec.  April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

April 31, 1910

Vonell Heffelfinger,  Rec. April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

April 23, 1910

Don C. Hursh,  Rec. July 31, 1910

Huntertown

April 12, 1910

Maggie Kell, Rec. Jan. 5, 1910

Huntertown

August 23, 1910

Myrtle B. Hursh,  Rec. July 31, 1910

Huntertown

May 8, 1910

Lucile Bolton,  Rec. July 17, 1910

Swan

July 4, 1910

Lovina Winters

Huntertown

July 28, 1910

Bell Ballard

Huntertown

November 20, 1910

Rosetta McComb,  Rec. Nov. 20, 1910

Huntertown

December 31, 1910

Grover Williams

Cedar Chapel

December 31, 1910

Martha Williams,  Rec. April 2, 1911

Cedar Chapel

December 31, 1910

Dell Funk,  Rec. April 2, 1911

Cedar Chapel

April 2, 1911

Matilda Funk,  Rec. April 1, 1911

Cedar Chapel

February 26, 1911

Sarah Glazier,  Rec. February 26, 1911

Huntertown

February 26, 1911

Romonia Houghton,  Rec. February 26, 1911

Huntertown

February 26, 1911

Carrie Knop,  Rec. Feb. 26, 1911

Huntertown

February 26, 1911

Rhena Dunten,  Rec. Feb. 26, 1911

Huntertown

February 26, 1911

Laurie Thompson,  Rec. February 26, 1911

Huntertown

January 1, 1912

Mary Ballou,  Rec. June 1, 1911

Huntertown

January 21, 1912

Mary Gaff, Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Loyd DeBolt, Rec. Sept. 8, 1912

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

John Kuse,  Rec. Sept. 8, 1912

Huntertown    (Kruse?)

January 28, 1912

Cecil I. Hippenhammer,  Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Gladys Runyon,  Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Lotting Klinger (Don's mother), Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Arie Gaff

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Mabel Kruse

Huntertown

January 28, 1912

Florence Knop,  Rec. May 24, 1912

Huntertown

May 17, 1912

Mary Dunfee

Huntertown

May 17, 1912

Nellie Dunfee

Huntertown

April 28, 1912

Emma Balliett,  Rec. May 26, 1912

Cedar Chapel

June 19, 1912

Jason Luyon, passed away

Swan

October 13, 1912

William Bracht,  Rec. Oct. 1912

Huntertown

January 30, 1913

Earl Griswold

Wallen

January 30, 1913

Glenn Irving

Wallen

January 30, 1913

Walter Keenan

Wallen

January 30, 1913

Victorean Keenan

Wallen

January 30, 1913

Eva Marie Swank

Wallen

January 30, 1913

Hattie L. Bailey

Not sure where

January 30, 1913

Ruby A. Fansler

Not sure where

January 30, 1913

Helen Moore

Wallen

February 23, 1913

Martha Gill

Wallen

May 9, 1913

Nellie Sovine, Rec. May 30, 1913

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Leonora Simons

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Emery Fuqua

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Charles S. Kruse

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Mary Kruse

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Arthur Knop

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Mary Parker (Wells)

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Rhua Gump

Huntertown

May 9, 1913

Leora Burrell

Huntertown

May 12, 1913

Ethel Malcolm

Huntertown

May 12, 1913

Ralph Rundles

Huntertown

January 12, 1913

Lillie Boren, Rec. May 30, 1913

Huntertown

January 12, 1913

Archie Boren

Huntertown

 

 

Hope I have missed no one.   Some came out in revivals, in fact several who never united with church and may have thought they were members when converted.   Then some marks were hard to determine.  Thirty years is some time.   Written February 1943.   Finished February 16, 1943.

 

                        _____________________________________________________________

 

BAPTISMS

 

HUNTERTOWN WORK, April 1908 to April 1913

 

1908

 

 

Anna Jennings, Rev. Charles Jennings mother

Summer 1908

Bonduran Pool near Fort Wayne, called back

1909

 

 

Grace Golden

January 3, 1909

Wallen Church

Pristhy Renneker

January 3, 1909

Wallen

Hulda Renneker

January 3, 1909

Wallen

Bessie Opliger

February 3, 1909

Wallen

Elsie Opliger

February 3, 1909

Wallen

Ralph Badiac, child of Charles and Hattie.

February 3, 1909

Wallen

Ralph Preston

May 16, 1909

Swan

Lincoln Bricker

May 16, 1909

Swan

Earnest T. Hall

May 23, 1909

Huntertown

Loren Hall

May 23, 1909

Huntertown

Milissea Wyatt

May 23, 1909

Huntertown

Minnie Collins

May 23, 1909

Huntertown

Bertha Grogg

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Velma Grogg

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Loyal Grogg

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Marion Thrush

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Marie Heffelfinger

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Iva Heffelfinger

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Cynthia Thompson

June 14, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Wilbur Dunten

June 24, 1909

Huntertown

Garnet Pence

August 12, 1909

Cedar Chapel

Silvus Wyatt

August 19, 1909

Huntertown 

1910

 

 

Vivian Ethel Fair

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Amanda Alice Wappes

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Elsie Fairchild Hanes

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Grace Marie Balliet

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Joanna Amanda Rickey

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

George Robert Thompson

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Alice Marie Grogg

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Edith Farner

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Vonell Heffelfinger

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Archie Michael Lung

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Roscoe Lung

April 3, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Don C. Hursh

May 8, 1910

Huntertown

Myrtle B. Hursh

May 8, 1910

Huntertown

Glenn C. Hursh

May 8, 1910

Huntertown

Lucille Bolton

May 15, 1910

Swan

Mildred Hoot

May 15, 1910

Swan

Murl Hoot

May 15, 1910

Swan

Florence Hoot

May 15, 1910

Swan

Charles Heffelfinger

May 25, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Frank Manes

May 25, 1910

Cedar Chapel

John Wappes

May 25, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Thelma Hawver

May 25, 1910

Cedar Chapel

Sarah Salome Rennecker

July 3, 1910

Wallen

Helen Marie Tompkins

October 9, 1910

May be Cedar Chapel

Rosetta McComb

November 20, 1910

Huntertown

1911

 

 

Sarah Glair

February 26, 1911

Huntertown

Carrie Knop

February 26, 1911

Huntertown

Omonia Houghton

February 26, 1911

Huntertown

Rhena Dunten

February 26, 1911

Huntertown

Laura Thompson

February 26, 1911

Huntertown

Matilda Funk

April 2, 1911

Cedar Chapel

William Delmore Funk

April 2, 1911

Cedar Chapel

Martha Anne Williams

April 2, 1911

Cedar Chapel

Myrtle Marie Snyder

April 23, 1911

Huntertown

Emma Louise Tilden

April 23, 1911

Huntertown

Gladys Runyon

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

Mary Gaff

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

Cecil Hippenhammer

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

Lottie Klinger

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

Florence Knop

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

May Surfus

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

John Kell

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

George V. Kell, Jr.

March 24, 1911

Huntertown

Stanton C. Swank

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Eugene Hunsburger

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Fay Hunsburger

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Frank Hunsburger

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Ina Swank

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Ilo Swank

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Gladys Vandola

March 24, 1911

Wallen

Florence Griswold

March 24, 1911

Wallen

1912

 

 

Theo Earnest Freeman

May 8, 1912

Cedar Chapel

Emma Balliet

May 26, 1912

Cedar Chapel

Jason Lion

June 19, 1912

Swan

Loyd DeBolt

August 16, 1912

Huntertown

John Kruse

August 16, 1912

Huntertown

Joseph W. Brackup

October 13, 1912

Wallen

Nellie Sovine

May 30, 1912

Huntertown

Lillian Boren

May 30, 1912

Huntertown

John Willard Emerick

May 30, 1912

Huntertown 

 

 

WEDDINGS

 

HUNTERTOWN WORK,  April 1908 to 1913

 

Weddings  performed  1908 and 1909 by Rev. Enoch A. Bunner, Huntertown, Indiana

These were not all at Huntertown, and as time has elapsed am not separating them. 

 

September 8, 1908

Ora Fair

40  years

Olive A. Pratt

24 years

September 8, 1908

Leroy Harvey Jones

34 years

Mary F. Anspaugh

32 years

September 9, 1908

Samuel Brown

32 years

Clara Nelson

21 years

December 25, 1908

Albert J. Darrow

22 years

Maggie May Porter

21 years

1909

 

 

 

 

January 24, 1909

George H. Bennett

26 years

Sophia Thompson

23 years

February 18, 1909

John DeWitt

26 years

Bessie Arlena Leiter

18 years

April 11, 1909

Frank Brown

27 years

Freda Smith

19 years

April 17, 1909

Charles W. Basse

26 years

May Rickey

19 years

May 2, 1909

Elroy A. Wildeson

31 years

Effie A. Miller

27 years

June 16, 1909

James Clarence Cowan

32 years

Julia A. Webster

24 years

July 24, 1909

Jesse Cleveland Busze

26 years

Stella S. Nelson

19 years

October 23, 1909

Milo Sloffer

26 years

Bertha Dunten

22 years

November 25, 1909

Carl W. Jennings

22 years

Anna A. McFadden

22 years

1910

 

 

 

 

January 1, 1910

Gloyd Brown

30 years

Loulettia Krumlauf

27 years

January 4, 1910

Frank W. Dale

26 years

Clara B. Daniels

21 years

May 13, 1910

Leonard P. Dunten

23 years

Sylvia M. Bates

21 years

April 28, 1910

Clarence W. Goheen

25 years

Ada P. Waters

25 years

April 28, 1910

Wm. E. F. Schuster

23 years

Edna L. Andrews

23 years

May 7, 1910

Frank H. Ramsey

23 years

Georgia D. Saylor

22 years

May 12, 1910

Clayton E. Haire

22 years

Grace A. Golden

20 years

June 4, 1910

H. B. Elson

26 years

Vivian E. Fair

21 years

June 12, 1910

Charles Miller

22 years

Ermina Pulver

20 years

June 15, 1910

Charles B. Arnold

26 years

Fladys Pearl Opliger

19 years

July 27, 1910

Elmer M. Cook

24 years

Carrie I. Opliger

18 years

August 14, 1910

Levi Binkley

63 years

Margaret Ischel Fox

59 years

September 22, 1910

Arthur L. Hollopeter

27 years

Ida M. Hippenhammer

19 years

October 13, 1910

Roy F. Moudy

21 years

Goldie M. Moss

21 years

December 14, 1910

Thomas H. Smithers

22 years

Elsie M. Opliger

18 years

December 25, 1910

John Dale Shriver

21 years

Myra Wells

20 years

December 25, 1910

Wilbur C. Goheen

22 years

Blanch Smith

20 years

1911

 

 

 

 

January 21, 1911

Willie T. Doty

23 years

Minnie I. Longardner

21 years

April 13, 1911

Wilber G. Hyde

26 years

Bertha A. Rundles

20 years

May 6, 1911

Clayton T. Root

29 years

Bessie E. Godley

29 years

June 20, 1911

Darnon B. Teeters

26 years

Alta M. Shriver

24 years

September 6, 1911

Walter W. Thrush

26 years

Inez V. Heitz

24 years

November 6, 1911

Ray Fansler

19 years

Mary Jarret

19 years

December 14, 1911

John Bailey

41 years

Albina Fensler

39 years

December 14, 1911

Herschel A. Hollopeter

24 years

Emma Tilden